Oyster ice cream: A surprising scoop of American food history

“People actually ate this...It was once a big deal in Read more

Chocolate, ice cream and N.C. root beer!

In my favorite round, Battle Uncle Scott's Root Beer, Merrell, who runs the tapas restaurant and "cocktaileria" Circa 81 restaurant in Morehead City, prepared one heck of a riff on a Black Cow, that famous chocolate, ice cream and Read more

Cooking lessons learned at 2014 Fire on the Dock

As the contest moves into its final battle tonight, I'm thinking back to the ideas I got during the 2014 tournament, part of the statewide Competition Dining Series that ultimately crowns an overall North Carolina winner from four regional Read more

Southern Collards should be the new kale

Will collards be the new kale, darling of diners seeking farm-to-table fare? If the 2014 Fire on the Dock chef competition is any indication, maybe. Read more

Food touring in Carrboro with Taste Carolina

As I often say, "I'm eat up with it," and Taste Carolina Gourmet Food Tours fed my obsession quite well this past weekend. Read more

top chefs

Chocolate, ice cream and N.C. root beer!

Chef Clarke Merrell may not have won the 2014 Fire on the Dock, but one of his dishes has been the competition’s highest scorer to date.

In my favorite round, Battle Uncle Scott’s Root Beer, Merrell, who runs the tapas restaurant and “cocktaileria” Circa 81 restaurant in Morehead City, prepared one heck of a riff on a Black Cow, that famous chocolate, ice cream and root beer float.

A traditional Black Cow involves a squirt of chocolate syrup in the bottom of a float glass. That gets topped with a couple scoops of vanilla ice cream. Pour root beer into the glass and prepare to sing the combination’s praises. So good.

For his plated dessert version, Merrell prepared root beer vanilla ice cream. He placed a scoop next to a crumble of coffee/root beer dark chocolate cake. Salted caramel, cashew candied bacon and root beer drizzle garnished the dessert. The treat evoked an old-fashioned soda fountain while providing an upscale feel. And the candied bacon? What fun!

Chef Clarke Merrell's put the Black Cow root beer float on a plate, earning high marks at Fire on the Dock (Photo courtesy of Competition Dining Series).

Chef Clarke Merrell’s put the Black Cow root beer float on a plate, earning high marks at Fire on the Dock (Photo courtesy of Competition Dining Series).

The sweet earned Merrell 32.21 points. We’ll see if anyone beats that in tonight’s final 2014 Fire on the Dock battle, where Cape Fear Country Club chef Antoine Murray meets 1900 Restaurant & Lounge chef Kirsten Mitchell.  The winner will move on to the statewide final later this year.

Merrell has competed in Fire on the Dock since the first competition in 2012. He and his loyal fans travel all the way from Morehead City for Fire on the Dock, staged at Wrightsville Beach. Cape Fear region fans who discovered Merrell at Fire on the Dock now travel to Morehead City, where Merrell not only operates Circa 81 but also Beaufort Olive Oil Company in Beaufort, N.C.

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Girls! Girls! Girls! Female chefs at Fire on the Dock

That professional kitchens remain male-dominated is surprising, considering women do much of the world’s everyday cooking. Remember in late 2013 when Time magazine left out any mention of female chefs in its Nov. 18, 2013, “Gods of Food” cover story and in the accompanying “chef family tree” that traced how great chefs are linked?

Despite the exclusions, women run or are key staffers in restaurant kitchens (Alice Waters, Dominique Crenn, Cat Cora, Elizabeth Falkner, Lidia Bastianich, Nancy Silverton, Amanda Freitag, Alexandra Guarnaschelli, Traci Des Jardins, to name a few).

Women are among Wilmington’s best chefs, three of whom will be in the mix of eight competitors when the annual cooking contest Fire on the Dock returns this month to Bluewater Waterfront Grill in Wrighsville Beach.

Fire on the Dock 2014 chefs ready for action.

Fire on the Dock 2014 chefs ready for action.

The female lineup includes Kirsten Mitchell of 1900 Restaurant Lounge, Tiffany Eslien of Hops Supply Co. and Katie Carter of The Olive Cafe & Wine Bar, all in Wilmington.

Other Wilmington-area contestants are Josh Petty of Sweet & Savory, James Rivenbark of South Beach Grill and Antoine Murray of Cape Fear Country Club. Coming from out of town are Clark Merrell of Circa 81 in Morehead City and Michael Barns of Prime 1079 at DoubleTree by Hilton hotel in Atlantic Beach.

I can’t recall a time when such a large number of female chefs took part in Fire on the Dock or any of the sponsoring Competition Dining Series’ contests. Each year, the Competition Dining Series stages regional professional cooking contests featuring restaurant chefs. The bracket-style tournaments culminate in a final battle to select the best chef from among statewide competitors.

Women have certainly marked Fire on the Dock. Mitchell made the final four in 2012′s event. And I’ll never forget the Cheerwine-braised collards that 2012 competitor Erin Wiley created when she was part of the YoSake restaurant team. Find Wiley at Pembroke’s these days. My favorite dish of the 2013 tournament was by Manna pastry chef Rebeca Alvarado Parades. As part of the YoSake team that year, she served super silky, intensely chocolate Texas Pete and cocoa cheesecake with Texas Pete gastrique, Texas Pete chocolate glaze, whipped mascarpone cream and a spicy almond lace cookie.

While I’m thrilled to see so many women in this year’s Fire on the Dock, which starts Jan. 27, I’m as excited about the guys, especially Josh Petty of Sweet & Savory.

Petty was the last Wilmington chef standing in the 2013 Fire on the Dock, and my money was on him to win thanks to push-the-envelope dishes he crafted along the way, namely as Asian-inspired soup. When my spoon broke into a deep-fried wonton, a soft egg yolk inside the package enriched the veal, lobster, black rice and vegetable soup. During a later battle, Petty’s Five Spice Peanut Tempura Shrimp, a crispy, sweet, spicy creation drizzled with Pepsi chili glaze, earned the night’s highest score.

The dishes weren’t perfect  — cooking competition offerings seldom are — but I’m hoping Petty’s experience with the contest will up his game.

Whoever wins is mostly up to diners. They score dishes along with professional judges. Seven Fire on the Dock 2014 battles are set each Monday from Jan. 27 to Feb. 17, and tickets are on sale. Preliminary battle tickets cost $74.78; final battle tickets cost $87.46.

Posted on by lizbiro in Chefs, dinner specials, Fire on the Dock, Restaurants, Uncategorized, Wrightsville Beach Leave a comment

Wilmington menu to aid typhoon victims in the Philippines

I was just considering a series about great Wilmington-area chefs and restaurants that fly under the radar when I saw a Facebook post from one of them that reminded me why I continue to write about restaurants. Readers may think it’s because I like to eat — and, of course, I do — but what keeps me most interested in the beat are the special people I meet along the way. Chef Danny Keegan of San Juan Cafe is one of them.

Keegan is a fantastic cook and a super-nice guy, as evidenced by the menu special he announced last night: Traditional Filipino cuisine will be served starting this Thursday and continuing through Saturday, with 10 percent of sales donated to Red Cross aid efforts in the typhoon-ravaged Philippines.

“This disaster hits close to home for us here at San Juan Cafe,” Keegan said on Facebook. “Our bartender, Katrina, has over a dozen family members who live on the Filipino island of Leyte in a province just outside of Tacloban. Please come out and help us support those who are in desperate need of assistance at this difficult time.”

The Filipino noodle dish pancit  and adobo, which usually involves meat, seafood and vegetables simmered in tangy soy garlic sauce, will both be on the menu this week, Keegan said.

San Juan Cafe tostones with caviar or tuna tartare are regulars on San Juan's menu.

San Juan Cafe tostones with caviar or tuna tartare are regulars on San Juan’s menu. (Photo courtesy of San Juan Cafe.)

Keegan opened San Juan Cafe, 3314 Wrightsville Ave., near Independence Boulevard, in 2010. He’s a passionate cook who strives to produce authentic Latin American cuisine, including that of this native Puerto Rico.

Trained at Johnson and Wales late Charleston, S.C., campus and an alumnus of various Key West and Cape Fear kitchens, Keegan has a knack with getting tostones (fried green plantains) just right, meaning crisp and light, and then crowning them with unexpected toppings, my favorite being caviar and cilantro-lime cream.

Duck two ways — tender confit and seared breast — arrives with caramelized onion demi-glace with soft arepas.

Knowing Keegan’s skill and heart, I can’t wait to see what he does with Filipino cuisine this week. Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

Posted on by lizbiro in Chefs, dinner specials, Midtown Wilmington, Restaurants Leave a comment

When chefs collide, what deliciousness!

Poke at Tamashii.

Poke at Tamashii. (Photo courtesy of Tamashii)

Wilmington restaurants come and go, but some cooks can’t stay away. Chef Eric Gephart is one of them. He used to run a much-loved seafood restaurant named Buoy 32 at Wrightsville Beach. After Buoy 32 closed, Gephart helped open and run downtown’s Mixto (closed til spring 2014). Next, he headed to Morrisville, where Gephart remains lead instructor at the The Chefs Academy. Tonight, he’s back in Wilmington cooking with friends at great Wilmington restaurant that flies under the radar.

Tamashii is a Masonboro Loop Road spot whose chef/owner Mark Scharaga sources local ingredients and sustainable seafood for traditional and unusual sushi on a mostly Asian menu that steps elsewhere with ceviche, poke and tartare, as well as eclectic entrees that speak to the way Scharage defines the restaurant.

“Tamashii, is a word that originates in Japan. In the simplest form it means “Soul,” Scharaga says at Tamashii’s website. ”This is essential to our chefs’ vision for the restaurant. We make food that comes from the soul of our being and the soul of the ingredients we use.”

Evidence of that arrives tonight (Nov. 9, 2013) when Scharaga and Gephart join forces for an Evening of Culinary Exploration, a five-course meal based on their shared imaginings. Each selection will be paired with wine or sake.

Tamashii is on Masonboro Loop Road, near Navaho Trail.

Tamashii is on Masonboro Loop Road, near Navaho Trail.

Gephart promises to bring back some Buoy 32-style delights; Scharaga will be behind the sushi bar crafting special noshes. On the menu are Hawaiian albacore with wasabi tempura and sweet red tobiko and a pork belly dish with ginger, Thai peppers and sweet potato mash. Oyster ice cream has been mentioned, too!

Josh Burris, a close friend of Gephart’s and a longtime Mixto cook who is now part of the team at Aubriana’s, one of Wilmington’s top restaurants, joins Scharaga and Gephart for the event.

The five-course meal costs $75. To make reservations, purchase tickets online or call Tamashii at 910-228-5576. Find the restaurant at 4039 Masonboro Loop Road.

Posted on by lizbiro in Chefs, dinner specials, Local food, Midtown Wilmington, Restaurants Leave a comment

Meet your food and the people who care about it!

A small selection of the 350 cheeses, many made in North Carolina, that Southern Foods sources for restaurants.

A small selection of the 350 cheeses, many made in North Carolina, that Southern Foods sources for restaurants.

A visit to the Southern Foods show in Greensboro this week reminded me of the huge amount of delectable food that is grown and produced in North Carolina, much of it on display in downtown Wilmington this weekend for the second Food For Thought festival.

No surprise that at the Southern Foods show I saw some of the chefs participating in Food For Thought, a farm-to-table-themed fundraiser that benefits New Hanover County libraries. Before North Carolina was a nationally known foodie mecca,  Southern Foods, founded in the mid-1950s, was delivering top-quality food to professional chefs, and that hasn’t changed.

Cape Fear-area chefs and restaurant owners I saw clustered around tables featuring fine N.C. cheeses and charcuterie.

One chef, Bobby Zimmerman, was behind a table showing off homegrown produce in two dishes he prepared: green curry shiitake mushroom soup and caramelized Brussels sprouts with a creamy tofu sauce. Zimmerman was Landfall Country Club’s executive chef before he became a corporate executive chef for Goldsboro-based Pate-Dawson Company/Southern Foods. Today, Zimmerman helps restaurants develop menus, recipes and systems, but he’ll  be back in Wilmington Sunday for Food For Thought.

Homegrown ingredients and the Wilmington chefs who use them are the highlights of the grand Nov. 3 Food For Thought tasting event at Cape Fear Community College’s new Union Station, downtown at the corner of Front and Red Cross streets.

Food For Thought will be a “gala brunch” where guests sample small-plate dishes, meet local farmers and food purveyors and browse informational displays about how North Carolina food is grown and where to find it.

“The whole event is to celebrate farm-to-market,” said Pat Bell, New Hanover County Library Foundation president and a Food For Thought organizer.

Scheduled 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., the $50-per-person Food For Thought is a fundraiser for the Cape Fear Community College culinary program and the New Hanover County Library.

Participating restaurants and chefs include Keith Rhodes of Catch, Charles Rousey of Hilton Wilmington Riverside, Tyson Amick of Aubriana’s, Brent Poteat of 22 North, Lee Grossman of Bento Box and Certified Master Chef Olivier Andreini of Landfall Country Club. Andreini took over the Landfall stoves when Zimmerman left.

Soon-to-open restaurants will be represented, as well, Bell said. On the list are downtown wine bistro Perkeo and uptown’s Pembroke’s, by the owners of downtown’s Rx, due to open possibly this weekend at The Forum.

Cape Fear Community College culinary school students will prepare and serve bites, as well.

The gathering will feature raffles for various prizes and food and cookbooks on the shelves at area libraries.

Tickets for kids age 12 and younger cost $25. Corporate sponsorships at the $250, $500 and $1,000 levels are available, too. Find tickets and information about sponsorships at New Hanover County Library branches.

This is the second Food for Thought, a biennial event first staged in 2011 at the county library near Landfall. “We wanted to involve the downtown as much as the uptown,” Bell said of the event’s venue this year.

 

Posted on by lizbiro in Chefs, downtown Wilmington, Farmers markets, Food festivals, Local food, Restaurants, Uncategorized Leave a comment

Food truck news: rally, new wheels and a restaurant!

TruckARooEventLogoAnother food truck rally is rolling into downtown Wilmington. Meantime, chef Keith Rhodes of well-known Catch restaurant is working on another food truck, and yummy Mex food truck La Bella Airosa is so successful it’s adding a restaurant to its food truck business!

Five food trucks are scheduled to compete in the third Truck-A-Roo, an event that lets diners vote for their favorite food truck.

Truck-A-Roo organizer Pipeline Event Management of Wilmington announced the latest date, scheduled 4 to 8 p.m. Nov. 2, 2013, at 101 N. Front St. in downtown Wilmington.

As with the previous two Truck-A-Roo rallies, the first in November 2012 and the second in June 2013, diners purchase a “sample ticket,” which costs $12 in advance or $15 at the gate. Ticket holders may try fare at each truck and then vote for their favorite taste.

The public needn’t purchase a ticket to attend Truck-A-Roo. Admission to the event, which includes beer sales and live bands, is free. Attendees who do not have tickets may purchase food from each truck.

Flaming Amy's Sacred Burrito Bus owner Jay Muxworthy taking first prize at the first Truck-a-Roo.

Flaming Amy’s Sacred Burrito Bus owner Jay Muxworthy taking first prize at the first Truck-a-Roo.

Participating trucks are Catch The Food Truck, The Patty Wagon burgers, Truck-a-Roo champ Flaming Amy’s Sacred Burrito Bus, Tacos El Nene and multi-award-winning Poor Piggy’s BBQ.

Look for a new food truck on the horizon!

Catch owner/chef Keith Rhodes is promising “hot chicken” and “sexy wings” on his approaching Wing Star food truck. The bright orange truck’s slogan is “Party Like a Wing Star!” Rhodes reported that he is still upfitting the truck, which he said is “coming together.” He has not announced a debut date.

Some restaurants have jumped on the food truck trend for catering. P.T.’s Olde Fashioned Grille is among them. The local burger chain’s truck is “used exclusively for parties, corporate events, private events, and lunch at the office. This food trailer is fully functional to cook our famous burgers, chicken sandwiches and fries on site!” according to the P.T.’s website.

Other trucks have inspired new restaurants. Recently, the owners of two trucks named La Bella Airosa purchased the 3500 N. Kerr Ave. building that once housed Pearl’s Seafood and Catering.

With around 7,000 square feet, the brick-and-mortar restaurant is large enough for 150 people, said Erik Romero, who operates the La Bella Airosa trucks with his parents and two brothers.The restaurant, of the same name as the trucks, will allow the family to expand the menu and offer more of La Bella Airosa’s current menu favorites such as tamales, which are served on Friday. Get there early, as service starts at 11 a.m. and the tamales are usually gone by 2 p.m., Romero said.

Chef Keith Rhodes is getting his Wing Star wheels rolling (Photo by Wing Star).

Chef Keith Rhodes is getting his Wing Star wheels rolling (Photo by Wing Star).

“Our speciaty is making everything from scratch: handmade tortillas, sauces homemade, everything pretty much fresh,” Romero said.

The mobile units will continue to operate when La Bella Airosa the restaurant opens in a few months, perhaps before the year’s end, Romero said.

One La Bella Airosa truck serves lunch and dinner in a parking lot on north Market Street, between Lullwater Drive and New Bern Street. The truck stays there late into the night on weekends.

The other truck parks near Wilco Hess and Intrepid Hardward on U.S. 117, near the N.C. 210 intersection at Rocky Point., Romero said.

The Romeros hail from the town of Pachuca, in the central Mexican state of Hidalgo. The windy town’s nickname is La Bella Airosa, or The Windy Beauty, Romero said.

Posted on by lizbiro in barbecue, Chefs, Downtown, downtown Wilmington, Food trucks, Midtown Wilmington, Uptown Wilmington Leave a comment

Rx beefs up the menu

The sign outside Rx last night read “pork belly” — in all caps — which was not unusual. That’s one of the restaurant’s signature dishes, trumped only perhaps by the kitchen’s crispy, Buffalo-sauced pig ears — or the bacon jam or the bacon vinaigrette or the pork chop or the pork ribs garnished with fried pork skins.

Pork rules Rx but last night was all about beef — namely marrow.

Marrow found in shank bones is so rich that it has been called “meat butter.” Rx owner/chef James Doss got his hands on several of the bones thanks to the arrival of nearly 500 pounds of lovely beef from a pasture-raised, antibiotic- and hormone-free Hereford/Angus cross from sustainable farming loyalist Bev Eggleston of EcoFriendly Foods.

Doss has various plans for the 21-day aged meat delivered this week. He and his cooks may pound some for chicken-fried steak. Four-ounce sirloins might accompany eggs at Sunday brunch. Of course, burgers are planned. Doss is further aging rib-eyes, and he’s considering extra-special preparations for tenderloin.

That all sounds delicious, but when Doss mentioned marrow bones my metabolism fired. I figured the faster I moved through Tuesday, the faster dinnertime would arrive. I grew up eating marrow bones at my parents’ table. I was long due for a fix.

Local oysters and boiled N.C. peanuts before beef marrow at Rx on downtown Wilmington's Castle Street.

Local oysters and boiled N.C. peanuts before beef marrow at Rx on downtown Wilmington’s Castle Street.

I landed at Rx around 8 p.m. After tucking into raw, local oysters from Hampstead’s Nature’s Way Farm & Seafood and a bowl of N.C. boiled peanuts garnished with cured ham, Doss presented roasted marrow set in rich brown broth and served alongside two meaty shiitake mushroom caps from Healing Earth Farm near Wilmington. Barely tart purslane balanced the dish’s savory riot.

Pulled from the bone and spooned up with a bit of the broth, the marrow was all creamy beef, melting butter and a bunch of umami at once. Each spoonful lasted but a moment on the tongue, yet I can still taste its deep flavor today.

Doss said he’ll get about 12 to 15 marrow bones from the beef load. The chef is still tweaking the presentation I sampled last night, but check for a marrow special on the Rx menu starting today. If you miss it, the dry-aged sirloin with roasted potatoes, shiitake mushrooms, green beans and blue cheese Mornay sauce is a fine substitute.

Find Rx Restaurant at Castle Street and 5th Avenue in south downtown Wilmington. Call 910-399-3080.

Roasted beef marrow bone with purslane and local shiitake mushrooms at Rx Restaurant.

Roasted beef marrow bone with purslane and local shiitake mushrooms at Rx Restaurant.

 

Posted on by lizbiro in Brunch, Chefs, dinner specials, Downtown, downtown Wilmington, Local food, Restaurants, ribs, Uncategorized Leave a comment

Fall delights on Wilmington menus

Sometimes it feels as if autumn is nothing but a leadup to Thanksgiving Day pumpkin pie. As soon as summer temperatures drop down to fall, pumpkins become cool.

Port City Java stores in Wilmington are serving pumpkin muffins. The shop’s pumpkin pie shake contains chai tea, ice cream cinnamon and Irish cream syrups and pumpkin pie spice. Pumpkin pie latte blends espresso, steamed milk, pumpkin pie spice and vanilla and cinnamon syrups.

Coastal Cupcakes downtown and at Wrightsville Beach is asking customers to suggest fall flavor ideas for the October and November cupcake list. Pumpkin was the No. 1 vote recently at the company’s Facebook fan page.

Pumpkin is not the only flavor on fall menus.

Salad turnips from Black River Organic Farm, one of the vendors you'll find at the downtown Wilmington Riverfront Farmers Market that happens 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays April-December.

Salad turnips from Black River Organic Farm, one of the vendors you’ll find at the downtown Wilmington Riverfront Farmers Market that happens 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays April-December.

The annual Oktoberfest celebration has begun at downtown’s The German Café, at The Cotton Exchange. Oktoberfest specials available until Oct. 31 include a $10 lunch and dinner special of grilled bratwurst on a bun with sauerkraut, a side of warm German potato salad, a 10-ounce German draft beer and a slice of strudel.

Collard greens have made appearances on Kornerstone Bistro’s menu, which regularly taps local growers for ingredients. At area farmers markets, look for more greens and lettuces, muscadine grapes, late-season peaches and tomatoes and, my favorite ingredient this year, tender, little salad turnips.

The turnips have a mild bite that is delicious raw or cooked. My Culinary Adventures with Liz Biro Top Chef Farmers Market Tour & Cooking Class have been playing with the turnips. Recent dishes prepared during class include roasted pumpkin and salad turnip risotto and a salad blending salad turnip roots and greens with poached pears and a firm, Havarti-like goat cheese from Nature’s Way.

Fall also brings Encore Magazine Restaurant Week, happening Oct. 23-30. Forty-three Cape Fear-area restaurants will offer nightly specials throughout the period. One of my favorite restaurant week stops is Caprice Bistro, which usually offers three fantastic courses for just $25! Menus will be posted soon.

Posted on by lizbiro in Chefs, Cooking classes, Downtown, downtown Wilmington, Farmers markets, French, Local food, Restaurants, Uncategorized, Uptown Wilmington, Wilmington Restaurant Week Leave a comment

Wilmington chefs on the move

Cape Fear area top chefs have been shuffling around, affording diners fresh opportunities for fine meals.

After seven years heading Blockade Runner’s kitchens, chef Mark Lawson departed Sept. 1 for Wilmington’s Circa Restaurant Group, Lawson said. Today, he begins work at Circa’s Osteria Cicchetti at The Forum shopping center. Blockade Runner has not released information about a Lawson replacement.

Also at The Forum, Scott Grimm will man stoves at a new restaurant moving into what was The Kitchen, which was another Circa Restaurant Group property.

Downtown’s Rx Restaurant owners James Doss and Josh Novicki purchased The Kitchen this summer and plan to open a yet-to-be-named Rx-style restaurant there in October, Doss said. Grimm and Doss have worked together at Rx and in Charleston, S.C. Grimm was last at Dockside. His creamy crab and corn chowder won the best in show award at the 2012 Taste of Wrightsville Beach food and wine festival.

Grimm has been in the new restaurant’s kitchen lately shucking locally grown sweet corn that was frozen for later use. Downtown, chef

Fenix Nelson has left Mixto. In his absence, downtown favorite Josh Woo of YoSake is running the Mixto kitchen with help from Mixto long-timer Josh Burris, Woo and Burris said. YoSake and Mixto share owners. Woo, a local foods disciple who wowed diners with Texas Pete-seasoned delights at the 2013 Fire on the Dock pro cooking competition, and Burris, who also clocks time at downtown’s Aubriana’s, are tweaking the Mixto list. They’re blending brunch specials into the regular menu on Sundays and frying mini, bacon-wrapped burritos.

Also downtown, Hilton Wilmington Riverside has named Charles Rousey as its executive chef. Rousey shook pans at Wallace’s Mad Boar before coming to the hotel. Rousey and Hilton Wilmington Riverside in August won the best entrée award at Wilmington’s Epicurean Evening to benefit the Methodist Home for Children. Rousey and team prepared grilled scallops with arame pesto and also grilled tenderloin on a bed of blue cheese.

Posted on by lizbiro in Brunch, Chefs, Downtown, Local food, New restaurants, Restaurants, Uncategorized, Uptown Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach Leave a comment

Master Chef arrives in Wilmington

One of America’s most highly rated chefs, Certified Master Chef Olivier Andreini, took over Landfall Country Club‘s stoves on Sept. 12, club general manager Steve Salzman said.

The American Culinary Federation, a professional organization founded in 1929, awards the Certified Master Chef title to already accomplished cooks who pass rigorous examinations. Chefs qualify to take the tests only if they are ACF Certified Executive Chefs or Certified Culinary Educators; can provide two recommendation letters from other Certified Master Chefs; and meet education and experience requirements.

Just 66 cooks in America hold the title of Certified Master Chef, the ACF reported at its website.

Andreini worked as a culinary professor at the acclaimed Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., according to his resume. Prior to his Landfall post, he was executive chef at the Merion Cricket Club in Havenford, Pa.

When previous Landfall chef Bobby Zimmerman left the club this summer to begin work as corporate executive chef for Goldsboro-based Pate-Dawson Company/Southern Foods, the club set out to find its first Certified Master Chef, Salzman said. At the same time, Andreini was considering a warmer climate that would take him into retirement, Salzman said.

Landfall plans various special events to welcome and introduce Andreini, perhaps including a month-long celebration, Salzman said.

Posted on by lizbiro in Chefs, Uncategorized Leave a comment